Tag Archives: wifi AP

Boost WIFI Speed by Forcing 40 MHz Channels in hostapd on RPi

802.11n can double the channel bandwidth of 802.11g from 20 MHz to 40 MHz, but this operation mode is not recommended in areas that the spectrums are congested and likely interfere with existing WIFI and bluetooth devices. As a result, hostapd will not enable 40 MHz when it finds other channels are being used, like what is seen from the hostapd log below:

However, this is unrealistic in modern cities. You should be grateful the primary channel you choose has not been used already, let alone the additional one for 40 MHz. What can we do? We have to force hostapd to turn on 40 MHz anyway. But since hostapd does not have any configuration options for that, we have to recompile hostapd from source. Actually, this has been done in other distros. For example, OpenWRT and Arch has patched their hostapd with the noscan patch, which adds an option to force 40MHz mode regardless of the environment.

Before turning on 40 MHz, the iwconfig on my laptop is like this, notice the bit rate is only 54 Mb/s:

Now let us start. First you need to add a deb-src source to apt so that we can download source packages. Note that I am still using Raspbian Wheezy. If you use Jessie, change the deb-src line according to your original deb line.

Save the following patch into a file:

Because we are going to create a new hostapd package, it’d be a good practice to increment the version number by adding a new section at the top of debian/changelog, like this:

Now we are ready to compile the packages:

If it succeeds, install the new package with dpkg -i.

Restart hostapd, it should now force 40 MHz mode:

And my iwconfig output now shows Bit Rate is 150 Mb/s, yay!

Deploy Shadowsocks on Raspberry Pi with ChinaDNS and Redsocks

Assume you already have a Raspberry Pi configured as a WIFI router like mine shown below, but you live in China and have to deal with the fact that many websites can’t be accessed due to GFW. Don’t be despair and with some hacking you can get your Internet freedom back.

IMG_20150714_134341

The mechanism is to use shadowsocks on your router which directs any traffic to a shadowsocks server in the free world. It’s simple to get it up and running on a local machine, but on a router you need to use redsocks to redirect traffic to the shadowsocks client running on your Raspberry Pi. DNS traffic has to be routed by redsocks as well otherwise your DNS replies will be contaminated. To remain as fast as normal when accessing China websites you also need to skip routing traffic to Redsocks for anything within the China IP ranges. Even if you don’t care about performance, this is still necessary in some circumstances like geoip restriction such as tv.sohu.com does not deliver contents if you live outside of China.

Finally, we want to improve the performance even further by using ChinaDNS. To avoid DNS poisoning, we can always resolve DNS over our secured shadowsocks connection, but this is not optimal if a China website have CDNs outside China. ChinaDNS queries local DNS servers to resolve Chinese domains and queries foreign DNS servers to resolve foreign domains, and from my testing it is useful to avoid DNS poisoning with the “DNS compression pointer mutation” option. (Update: I have switched from ChinaDNS to dnsmasq+dnscrypt, please read Securing DNS Traffic in China to see how it works.)

Shadowsocks

I assume that you have shadowsocks server running on a public server, so I will skip that part and only talk about the client side.

Installing shadowsocks is very simple, note that it will be installed under /usr/local/.

Start up shadowsocks while listening on local port 1080:

Redsocks

Install redsocks, simply apt-get from the archive:

Then you need to change the START option in /etc/default/redsocks from NO to YES, so that redsocks will start automatically at boot time and also can be started by sudo /etc/init.d/redsocks start:

Then update /etc/redsocks.conf. Most of the default settings work fine, just need to change local_ip in the redsocks section to your address of the network interface that accepts traffic from your local network. The default is 127.0.0.1, but that does not work well if you want to re-route traffic from other machines on your network, so change it to something like:

But we want traffic from other hosts in your network to be redirected by redsocks to your local shadowsocks client, which in turn sent to the the remote shadowsocks server. We need to pay special attention to DNS traffic, as DNS poisoning is prevalent in China. We need to take special care to redirect DNS traffic through redsocks/shadowsocks.

We also want all China traffic NOT to go through shadowsocks for performance. This can be easily done by looking at the destination IP, if it is in the China IP range we skip going through the REDSOCKS china. First we need to get all network segments allocated to China and save it to a file called chnroute.txt:

These all can be accomplished by iptables. You need to run the following iptables commands, or put them in a local script and run it with sudo.

Run iptables -t nat -L -n to make sure the rules have been added correctly. Now start up redsocks by sudo /etc/init.d/redsocks start and let’s test it out by doing some web browsing on another computer in your local network. If that works fine, congratulations and you have set up everything correctly! If not, look at shadowsocks output and also turn on redsock’s log_debug and check if there is anything useful in /var/log/daemon.log.

ChinaDNS

ChinaDNS is not absolutely necessary, but as explained at the beginning it is desirable. There is no pre-built package so we need to compile it. It is simple to do:

After it is successfully compiled, test it out:

If it goes well, run src/chinadns -m -c chnroute.txt when your router boots.

That’s it! I hope these are useful to you.

Update: I have switched from ChinaDNS to dnsmasq+dnscrypt, please read Securing DNS Traffic in China to see how to set it up.